AFRICAN COORDINATION CENTRE FOR THE ABANDONMENT OF FEMALE GENITAL MUTILATION/CUTTING (A.C.C.F.A) AT THE UNIVERSITY OF NAIROBI - ACCAF

Africa Coordination Centre for abandonment of Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting (ACCAF) was formally established in 2012 as a trans-disciplinary, both in approach and personnel to champion efforts and address the gaps in abandonment of FGM/C in the Africa region within one generation. The Centre is hosted by the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, at the University of Nairobi with the overall aim of strengthening capacity in the region for research, implement interventions and monitor progress in accelerating efforts towards the abandonment of FGM/C and improved care for women and children suffering negative consequences of the practice. During 2011 international conference hosted by the Centre, it was mandated to coordinate research, training/capacity building, dissemination of evidence based practices and strategies for abandonment of FGM, influence policy and behavior change.

A Resource/Coordination Centre in Africa could help to stimulate and facilitate the situation for many who feel alone in their work in their own institutions and countries, providing support of various kinds and opportunities for capacity building. Strengthening capacity in Africa for producing evidence, improving care, implementing interventions and monitoring progress is the key to hastening abandonment efforts.

Vision

Our vision is to be a Centre of excellence championing multidisciplinary collaborator efforts with the goal of accelerating the abandonment of GM/C in Africa and beyond.

Mission

The Centre will contribute to the abandonment of FGM within Africa and beyond through innovative research, leadership, training, health care and guidance, advocacy for cultural change, and networking and capacity strengthening.

The University of Nairobi has existing local, African and global relationships with many organizations/institutions and individuals that have offered their support in the establishment of the Centre. The Centre is in partnership with other universities and international organizations, including the Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction (HRP) of the World Health Organization, UNFPA, UNICEF, USAID, the University of Sydney, Australia, the International Centre for Reproductive Health at the University of Ghent, Belgium, the University of Washington, Seattle, USA.  These partners have been brought together as a trans-disciplinary team, composed of experts with specific interest in different aspects of FGM/C.

African institutions that have been in partnership for FGM/C research include: Université Cheikh Anta Diop in Senegal;  The Department of Community Health at the College of Health Sciences at the Obafemi Awolowo University in Nigeria; The Egyptian coalition of NGOs , Assiut University   Jimma University, Ethiopia; Karolinska Institutet, Freetown, Sierra Leone; University of Medical Sciences and Technology, Khartoum, Sudan; Université de Bamako, Mali; and The School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Kenya Methodist University.

Geographical location:  The ACCAF is based in Nairobi, with coordinating offices in Egypt and Bukina Faso to coordinate the activities of ACCAF in the arab speaking and francophnone countries respectively.

Pertinent research, capacity building and work experience representative accomplishment in developing countries in implementing program and activities on FGM/c:

Capacity building:

  • Mainstreaming the teaching on sexuality in curricula of Obstetrics and Gynaecology undergraduate and postgraduate programs in UoN
  • Training on Family Life
  • Training in epidemiology, medical anthropology and population dynamics
  • Community sensitization projects on FGM/C sexual and reproductive health issues
  • Training  of health workers s advocates of FGM/C abandonment
  • Evaluation for strengthening health systems to increase utilization of safe motherhood and obstetric fistula services project in East Africa.
  • Training on sexual and reproductive health,  in Anglophone africa

Significant product, approaches, and tools:  Several research articles are published as products of various researches. These publications cover various aspects of FGM/C, sexual and reproductive health. These include the following;

 

Dr Tammary Esho

Esho T. 2014 Sex after the cut; The psychosexual consequences of female genital cutting among the Maasai. Lambert Academic Publishing.

Esho et al. 2010 Female genital cutting and sexual function: In search of a new theoretical model. Africa Identities, 8 (3): 221-234

Esho et al. 2013. Borders of the present: Maasai tradition, modernity and female identity. Chapter 8, In Borderlands and Frontiers in Africa. Munster Lit Verlag.

Esho T. 2010. On female circumcision and early marriages amongst the Maasai. African Identities, 8 (1), 79-82. Journal

 

Prof Violet Kimani

Kimani V. 1984. Female circumcision in Kenya; A pilot socio-cultural study in Embu. NBI, IDRC funded.

Kimani V. Gender power relations and sexual negotiations among married women; A community focused study in Murang’a Kenya

 

Dr Alice Mutungi

Mutungi A. 1997. Induced abortion among adolescents in Kiambu and Nairobi.

 

Prof Christine Kigondu

Kigondu C.K. HIV and contraceptive use especially IUCD led acceptance of HIV+ women to continue using IUCD worldwide

 

Prof Nyamongo I.

Research on Gender and power relations and FGM using human relations and files (HRAF)

Research on social norms change and FGM

Research on HIV/AIDs

Research on obstetric fistula in West Pokot

 

Prof Ndavi

Supervision of research sexuality connections in sexual and reproductive health on department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, UoN.

 

Some of the tools developed in our projects include; the FGM training curriculum, social norm manual, training material for mainstreaming adolescent and Youth sexuality through Family Life Education in schools in Anglophone Africa

Evidence successful record of similar program: ACCAf is new organization, Usaid supported project is being implemented

ACCAF Activities

USAID- community participation, training of health workers, undergraduate and postgraduate students and community workers/leaders. Community Research  training workshops were held with an emphasis on capacity building with the aim of having those who have undergone training become FGM/C abandonment advocates and/or conduct similar trainings themselves.

ACCAF TEAM COMPOSITION AND PROFILES

Professor Joseph G. Karanja

Professor Karanja is an Associate Professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at the University of Nairobi, Kenya. He is also a practicing consultant Obstetrician and Gynaecologist at Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi. He graduated MB, ChB in 1976 and M.Med. (Obs/Gynae) in 1983. He has undertaken other short courses locally and internationally. He has a conducted and participated in many researcher projects and is an expert in curriculum and training materials development, safe motherhood and reproductive health. He is an advocate of women’s sexual and reproductive rights and participated actively in the recent constitutional review process in Kenya. He was a member of WHO Working Group on FGM that that wrote the FGM document of 1997 and was a Principal investigator for the multicentre WHO study on Obstetric sequelae of FGM.

Professor Isaac K. Nyamongo

Professor Nyamongo is a Professor of Social Anthropology and the Director of the Institute of Anthropology, Gender and African Studies at the University of Nairobi, Kenya. His academic qualifications include a Bachelor of Science and a Master of Science in Anthropology from Punjab University. He graduated from the University of Florida with a PhD in Anthropology in the year 1998. He has wide experience teaching various courses in Anthropology both at the Undergraduate and Postgraduate levels. He had wide experience conducting evaluation research and anthropological studies. More specifically he has been involved in consultancies in the following areas: malaria, HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, reproductive and sexual health and research.

Professor Violet Kimani

Professor Kimani is a Professor in the Department of Community Health at the University of Nairobi, Kenya. Her academic qualifications include; A Bachelors degree in Sociology, Masters in Medical Sociology, Certificate in Medical Anthropology and Health Behavior and a PhD degree in Community Health. She teaches social medicine to undergraduate and postgraduate medical students in the Department of Community Health. She has conducted research and evaluation among different communities in many areas such as:  health beliefs and behavior; gender power and health and social development; reproductive health issues, including cancers, fertility and menopause; sexual behavior risk and HIV/AIDS; primary health care; and the Millennium Development Goals.

Professor Christine Kigondu

Professor Kigondu is an associate professor in the Department of Human Pathology, Unit of Clinical Chemistry, School of Medicine, College of Health Sciences, University of Nairobi. Her academic qualifications include a Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry and a PhD in Clinical Biochemistry. She has done extensive research if the field of reproductive health. The research has included assessing the factors leading to the non use of various contraceptives and interaction between HIV and contraceptive use. She has also published extensively in topics such as infertility management and endocrinology. Her interest in reproductive has led her to the field of female genital mutilation/cutting. She has been very instrumental in the coordinating of the recent conference in FGM/C to take place in Nairobi, Kenya on the 17-19th of October, 2011 and drafting a proposal to set up a Centre for elimination of FGM/C.

Professor Zahida Qureshi

Professor Qureshi is an associate professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, College of Health Sciences, University of Nairobi. She is the current Chairman of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at this university. She has been very prolific in sexual and reproductive health research and studies. 

Dr. Guyo Jaldesa (Center Coordinator)

Dr. Jaldesa is a Senior Lecturer and Consultant Obstetrician and Gynaecologist at the University of Nairobi.  He graduated MB, ChB in 1990 and M.Med. (Obs/Gynae) in 1997 from University of Nairobi and Master of science in Reproductive health from The university of Edinburgh. He has conducted various studies on FGM/C in Kenya, key among them as a Principal investigator for the multicentre WHO study on Obstetric sequelae of FGM. Dr Jaldesa also played a key role in developing the reference manual for health service providers in Kenya. He has also had an instrumental role the coordination of the recent  FGM/C conference in Nairobi, Kenya that took place on the 17-19th of October 2011. He is an advocate of women’s sexual and reproductive rights and participated actively in the recent passage of the FGM Prohibition Act in Kenya.

Professor Patrick Muia Ndavi

Prof. Ndavi is an Associate Professor and Consultant Obstetrician and Gynaecologist at the University of Nairobi. His academic qualifications include a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery and Master of Medicine in Obstetrics and Gynaecology from the University of Nairobi, Master of Science in Epidemiology from University of London, Certificate in Medical Anthropology and Health Behavior Research from Harvard University. He has wide experience teaching various courses in obstetrics and gynaecology, epidemiology, population dynamics and research methods both at the undergraduate and postgraduate levels. He had wide experience conducting monitoring and evaluation research and epidemiological studies. More specifically he has been involved in consultancies in the following areas: reproductive and sexual health and research.

Dr Tammary Chekoech Esho

Dr Tammary Esho is a public health scientist with specialization in sexual medicine practicing as a consultant and a lecturer in Nairobi, Kenya. Her academic qualifications include; Diploma in Clinical Medicine and Surgery from the Kenya Medical College,  Master of Science in Human Sexuality and a Doctorate in Biomedical Sciences from the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium. She is a lecturer at the Department of Community and Public Health, School of Health Sciences, Technical University of Nairobi Kenya. Throughout her doctoral studies she conducted her research on the psychosexual consequences of Female Genital Cutting amongst Maasai women culminating in several peer reviewed publications. Her areas of interest include Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting, Sexual and Gender based violence and Sexual and Reproductive Health research and training.

 

Recent and/or Relevant Publications and Projects of the Team:

1.            Khisa, A. M., & Nyamongo, I. K. (2011). What factors contribute to obstetric fistulae formation in rural Kenya? African Journal of Midwifery and Women’s Health, 5(2): 95-100.

2.            Jaldesa, G. W., Qureshi, Z. P., Kigondu, C.S. (2010). Psychosexual problems associated with Female Genital Mutilation (FGM). J. Obstet. Gynaecol. E. and Centre. Afr., 22 (1): 1-7.

3.            Nyamongo, I.K. (2009). Human sexuality in Africa: Beyond reproduction. In Eleanor Maticka-Tyndale, Richmond Tiemoko & Paulina Makinwa-Adebusoye (Eds.) Global Public Health. Auckland Park, South Africa: Fanele.

4.            Nyamongo, I. K., Olungah, C. O. & Bukachi, S. (2008). Factors Contributing to the Decline of FGM in Kenya: Lessons from the Akamba and Maasai Communities. Final Report to GTZ, November 2008.

5.            Jaldesa, G. W. (2008). Management of complications pregnancy, childbirth and the postpartum period in the presence of FGM/C: A reference manual for health service providers. Nairobi, Kenya: Ministry of Health.

6.            Jaldesa, G.W. (2007). A religious oriented approach to addressing FGM/C among the Somali community of Wajir, Kenya. Nairobi Kenya: Population Council/USAID.

7.            WHO study group on female genital mutilation and obstetric outcome* (2006). Female genital mutilation and obstetric outcome: WHO collaborative prospective study in six African Countries. The Lancet, 367(9525): 183-1841. (*Participation from Karanja, J.G., Jaldesa, G.W., & Kigondu, C.S.)

8.            Jaldesa, G.W., Askew, I., Njue, C., Wanjiru, M. (2005). Female Genital Cutting among the Somali of Kenya and Management of its Complications. Nairobi, Kenya: Population Council/FRONTIERS/USAID

9.            Kimani, V.N. (2004). Evaluation of the anti-FGM project: Final Report. Nairobi, Kenya: World Vision Kenya, TOT ADP.

10.          Jaldesa, G.W., Quereshi, Z.P., Sekandde-Kigondu, C.B., Wanjala, S.M.H. (1998). Maternal Mortality in Garissa Provincial Hospital. J. Obstet. Gynaecol. E. and Centre. Afr., 14: 68.

11.          Jaldesa, G.W., Quereshi, Z.P., Sekandde-Kigondu, C.B. (1998). Factors Enhancing the Practice of Female Genital Mutilation among Kenyan Somalis. J. Obstet. Gynaecol. E. and Centre. Afr., 14: 110.

12.          Kimani, V.N. (1994). Female circumcision in Kenya: A pilot socio-cultural study in Embu and Nairobi districts. Ottawa, Canada: IDRC.

13.          Kimani, V.N. (1984). Female Circumcision in Kenya. A Socio-Cultural and Health Study and Proposals for Change - Presented to the 1st International Health Policy Program (IHPP) Conference, April 1988, Nairobi, Kenya.